St. Austell Brewery takes Glastonbury by storm

A staggering 30,000 pints were sold in  St Austell Brewery‘s ‘pop-up’ pub – the ‘Cornish Arms’ in the heart of Glastonbury Festival.

For the second year running the ‘Cornish Arms’ was a massive success – despite the mud – with the bar crowded from 10am until the early hours with festival goers enjoying a pint or two of St Austell Brewery beer. It was the only bar at Glastonbury serving cooled cask ale.

The Brewery’s mission was to meet Michael Eavis’ request to recreate a proper Cornish pub in the middle of Glastonbury festival.

Jeremy Mitchell, Marketing Director at St Austell Brewery, said: “We’ve had excellent feedback, with many people saying it was the best bar at the festival – no small compliment considering there were more than 100 bars to choose from.

“The stars of the show were undoubtedly Tribute, Proper Job and Trelawny, and we sold 13,000 pints of cask ale during the five days. Tribute was our top seller, as many people from all over the country already knew the brand.

“Proper Job was a rising star and captured the imagination of many people new to cask ale. It was a favourite of the editor of the official Q Glasto Review magazine and we were delighted when it was listed in the Vibes section. It confirms what we already knew – cask ale is officially cool!”

This year the Cornish Arms washed up on the Glastonbury fields with an underwater “shipwrecked” theme – apt considering the deluge of rain at the beginning of the festival. The whole inside of the marquee was wrapped in blue fabric, with fish and surfboards suspended from the ceiling and projected underwater scenes on the walls.

The Brewery headed to the festival with a shopping list of items needed to build a pub from scratch in the middle of a field. The list included more than 200 barrels of Tribute, Proper Job and Trelawny; a 17m long bar; an 8ft wooden mermaid; eight fridges; 300 cardboard mackerel; eight surfboards, 16 mannequin legs; 20 bar staff hand-picked from Cornish pubs and one kitchen sink.

Fishermen’s Friends performed in the Cornish Arms following their set on the Pyramid Stage on Sunday, bringing together Cornish people and lovers of the county from throughout the 180,000 strong festival community.

Jon Cleave

Gully T-shirt

[N.B. Before he was better known as one of the Fisherman’s friends, John Cleave already had a bit of a local reputation as the author and illustrator of ‘Gully’, a seagull who inhabited Port Isaac. My son is a fan as can be seen by his Gully t-shirt.]

St Austell Brewery, facts and information:

  • Founded in 1851, St Austell Brewery is known to be one of the oldest businesses in Cornwall
  • It is one of only 30 Independently Family Owned Brewers in the UK.
  • The company owns 174 pubs.
  • It is the South West’s largest wholesale distributor of beer, ciders, wines, spirits and soft drinks, serving more than 3,000 free trade accounts, from pubs, clubs, restaurants, hotels and other licensed outlets in Cornwall, Devon, Somerset and Dorset.
  • The company employs up to 1,000 people including part-time and seasonal staff.
  • The company brews five main cask ale beer brands: Tribute, Proper Job, Tinners, IPA and HSD.
  • The bottled beer range consists of HSD, Tribute, Proper Job, Admiral’s Ale and Clouded Yellow.
  • The company markets its cask ales nationally.
  • The company also distributes a full range of national brands of beers and minerals and a full range of wines and spirits under the Walter Hicks label.
  • The company is a recognised centre of excellence for training, accredited by the British Institute of Innkeeping (BII), offering a wide range of courses to people who work in the licensed trade.
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